1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet
Oxford Jewel

1930s Art Deco Filigree Sugarloaf Malachite Glass Bracelet

Regular price $135.00 $0.00 Unit price per

Victorian influenced in its design, yet made during the 1930s, this striking bracelet is special for its sugarloaf shaped glass cabochons. Jutting outward from the wrist in high relief, the deep green glass has distinct patterning made to simulate the gemstone malachite. The brass filigree setting adds a delicate looking touch that counterbalances the bold cut of the glass for a complimentary combination.


Condition Guide Excellent. This piece is fresh looking and must have been tucked away and well taken care of, the signs of wear are noticeable only on close inspection.

* The setting has a golden patina with minor darkening and discoloration that is noticeable mainly at the back of the piece.
* The glass is smooth and gleaming without any chipping or surface wear.
* There are no irregularities to the setting or signs of solder or repair, the components are original and the piece has a firm shape.


Length 7"

Width 1 1/8"

Mark No mark

Clasp Secure, and original

Weight 42 grams

Period 1930s

Material Brass, Glass


Collector Note

On Czech Glass. Czech or bohemian glass created from the end of the Victorian era through the mid-century was world-renowned for its unprecedented resemblance to natural gemstones. Skilled craftsman from the region engineered new methods of cutting and coloring glass to simulate the look of rubies, diamonds, emeralds, sapphires, and more. In addition, Czech glass jewelry makers were highly trained in the metalwork for the settings around the glass. The Czech region produced so many different styles (all of superb quality) that Czech glass pieces have become their own collectable category.


On Glass Made to Simulate Gemstones. Glass has long been used by jewelers to simulate natural gemstones. For instance, during the Georgian era, black dot paste is a term that refers to a style of glass that was made to simulate the sparkle of natural diamonds. But in the 1940s, the use of glass to simulate gemstones ramped up more than ever before. World War II constrained both fine materials and pocketbooks, so more and more designers (including high-end designers) focused on glass to re-create the distinctive properties of different gems. High-end designers thus began making costume glass jewelry - but with the same attention to detail, high craftsmanship, and design skill that was applied to fine jewelry.