Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet
Taxco

Early Mexican Taxco Sterling Silver Turquoise Glass Curb Chain Bracelet

Regular price $150.00 $0.00 Unit price per

Curb chain links wrap smoothly and sturdily around your wrist for a fluid fit that is continued with a thoughtfully curved clasp. The sterling setting is punctuated with vivid blue glass cabochons made to simulate Persian turquoise. Domed in shape that jut outward from your wrist strikingly. There is an almost matching necklace up for auction as well (almost exactly the same design but made by different Mexican designers) so please view all of the auctions up for bid.

Condition: Excellent. This piece is fresh looking and must have been tucked away and well taken care of, or worn infrequently.

* The silver has a bright patina without any dents and very little surface wear.
* The glass has a smooth and gleaming surface without any chipping and very little scratching.
* There are no irregularities to the setting or signs of solder or repair and the piece has a firm shape.


Length 7 1/4"

Width 7/8"

Mark See photo (signed J.D.E. La Puente)

Clasp Secure, and original

Weight 49 grams

Period 1940's

Material 950 (a bit higher silver content then sterling silver), glass



Collector Tip
On excellent condition
Antique and vintage pieces have been passed through generations, so it's not often you find a piece that has be maintained in its near-original condition. Such pieces are not only higher in value, but they are also more collectible, as they carry the history of past owners but do not show it. They reveal what the piece would have looked like when it was first created, giving us an insight into a bygone era.

On Taxco, Mexico, jewelry
Jewelry made in Taxco, Mexico, through the early to mid 20th century are now highly collectable for their artisan style and the quality of the silverwork. Taxco, Mexico, was established as the center for quality silver jewelry of a distinctively Mexican style around 1926, when American William Spratling moved there. From the traditional silver workers, Spratling learned the pre-Columbian techniques of making silver jewelry and set up an apprenticeship program for talented silver artisans from Mexico and beyond. Taxco soon became not only a fixture in American imagination-a charming, old-world town where handmade artisans lived, worked, and were inspired-but also a quality alternative to Europe as a source for fine jewelry. It's this storied history, combined with the quality of the work, that has made Taxco pieces sought-after collectables.

On Mexican silver
The tradition of Mexican silver jewelry began when the Spanish conquered the region and taught the native peoples the craft of silverwork. Yet, much of Mexican silver jewelry actually dates to the early- to mid-20th century, when the distinctive style came into its own: silver pieces with a handmade, almost primitive look and feel, bold and chunky designs, and the use of bright, natural gemstones like turquoise and amethysts (often chosen for organic patterning). The draw of Mexican silver jewelry comes from its artisan roots, every piece with a considered and visceral feel.