Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant
Oxford Jewel

Victorian 1.5" Gold Filled Paste Forget Me Not Flower Locket Pendant

Regular price $165.00 $0.00 Unit price per

The language of flowers or Floriography, often used in jewelry design during the Victorian era, allowed communication to flow between two people when words were deemed too forward and this antique locket is a classic example. A charming forget-me-not flower and leaf pattern, is given dimensional form through a repousse technique, and accented with paste stones for rich color and shimmer. Generously sized, this large locket has ample room for a slim remembrance or photo to be tucked safely inside as the locket shuts firmly with a soft snap.


Condition Guide Excellent. This piece is fresh looking, it must have been tucked away and well taken care of, the signs of wear are noticeable on inspection.

* The setting is golden with a minor amount of surface scratching and wear and no dents or misshapen spots.
* The paste stones are all in place with some darkening and surface wear but the stones still have sparkle.
* The locket snaps shut firmly with a soft snap.
* The locket has one original photo frame and no plastic or glass inserts.
* There are no other irregularities to the setting or signs of solder or repair and the piece has a firm shape.


Diameter 1 1/2" excluding bale

Mark No mark

Clasp Secure, and original and snaps shut firmly

Weight 15.1 grams

Period Late Victorian c. 1900 - 1910s

Material Tests positive for gold filled, glass


Collector Note

On Floriography. The language of flowers, or Floriography, is rooted in the Victorian era. It refers to the assignment of special emotional meanings to certain flowers. Including those flowers in jewelry was a way to slyly convey one's feelings in a society that discouraged showing your emotions. For example, red roses were (and still are today) associated with romantic love and passion, while forget-me-knots were associated with remembrance.


On Victorian. A young Queen Victorian assumed her role in 1837 and her taste in jewelry quickly became culturally influential, within England and beyond. Her relationship to jewelry was enmeshed with her husband, Prince Albert, who gifted the Queen for their engagement, a snake ring, embedded with an emerald (her birthstone) in its head. Continuing from the Georgian era and intensified by Queen Victoria's taste, sentimental and figural jewelry was a major trend throughout the Victorian era. When certain ideas and words were deemed too forward or improper to be spoken, jewelry and symbolic meaning was used to communicate what was left unsaid.