Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet
Oxford Jewel

Victorian Mourning Pressed Horn FERN 2” Wide Stretch Expansion Bracelet

Regular price $195.00 $0.00 Unit price per

Very good condition. Fresh looking, wear is noticeable on close inspection.

* Vulcanite has crackling and some irregularity to the surface but there are no distinct chips or breaks to the pendants.
* Fern design is crisp and detailed.
* Expansion band grips firmly and stretches smoothly as it should.
* No clasp, bracelet slips over your hand.


Era Victorian

Length 6 1/8" interior circumference and can expand an additional 1"

Width 2"

Mark No mark

Weight 54 grams

Material Vulcanite


Collector Note
Made by hand or in small groups of similar styles, vintage jewelry is individualistic with its own special history.

* Bold and unique piece that shows the obsession Victorian's had for ferns or Pteridomania.
* While similar Victorian pressed horn expansion pieces come up from time to time, this piece has a larger silhouette than most.
* Each link is slightly tiered and domed in shape jutting outward from your wrist when worn.

BackStory
On Mourning Jewelry. Mourning jewelry from the Georgian and Victorian eras were special, custom pieces designed in the memory of a deceased loved one. While many mourning pieces used dark materials like natural onyx or jet to convey grief, they were often surprisingly hopeful, as the majority of the western world believed they would one day be reunited with their loved one in the afterlife. Pieces incorporated symbols that represented this hope or the characteristics of their loved one, as well as locks of hair or small portraits. Today, collecting and wearing antique mourning jewelry is to honor the memory of a real person and appreciate the sentimentality of a bygone era.


On Floriography. Floriography, or the language of flowers, is rooted in the Victorian era. It refers to the assignment of special emotional meanings to certain flowers. Including those flowers in jewelry was a way to slyly convey one's feelings in a society that discouraged showing your emotions. For example, red roses were (and still are today) associated with romantic love and passion, while forget-me-knots were associated with remembrance.