Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin
Antique

Victorian Tri Gold Plated Fire Opal Flower Brooch Pin

Regular price $195.00 $0.00 Unit price per

Excellent condition. Fresh looking, soft wear is noticeable only on close inspection.

* Gold plated setting has a bright patina with minor surface wear noticeable at the back of the piece.
* No dents or imperfections to the shape or signs of repair.
* Opal is smooth with no chips or surface wear and no cracks or crazing.
* Clasp is secure and original.


Era Victorian

Length 1 1/4"

Width 3/4"

Mark No mark

Weight 2.6 grams

Material Tests for gold plating, natural opal


Collector Note
Made by hand or in small groups of similar styles, vintage jewelry is individualistic with its own special history.

* Detailed and charming floral design, note three shades of gold plating were used.
* Tiny opal (3mm across) is brighter and more vibrant than photos with pink,green,blue and orange.
* Finely constructed and dimensional looking, this piece is thin and feather-light feeling in your hand.


BackStory
On Floriography. Floriography, or the language of flowers, is rooted in the Victorian era. It refers to the assignment of special emotional meanings to certain flowers. Including those flowers in jewelry was a way to slyly convey one's feelings in a society that discouraged showing your emotions. For example, red roses were (and still are today) associated with romantic love and passion, while forget-me-knots were associated with remembrance.


On Victorian. A young Queen Victoria assumed her role in 1837 and her taste in jewelry quickly became culturally influential, within England and beyond. Her relationship to jewelry was enmeshed with her husband, Prince Albert, who gifted the Queen for their engagement, a snake ring, embedded with an emerald (her birthstone) in its head. Continuing from the Georgian era and intensified by Queen Victoria's taste, sentimental and figural jewelry was a major trend throughout the Victorian era. When certain ideas and words were deemed too forward or improper to be spoken, jewelry and symbolic meaning was used to communicate what was left unsaid.